Congress Spotlight #24 – Got a question? Biomass may be the answer

Got a question? Biomass may be the answer

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By selecting proper species and breeding experiments as well as genetic modifications as done here in Thailand, fast growing species plantations are capable of producing enormous amounts of biomass within short periods of time. The challenge is, however, to sustain soil fertility, biodiversity and other ecosystem services such as clean water. (Photo by Victor Bruckman)

By selecting proper species and breeding experiments as well as genetic modifications as done here in Thailand, fast growing species plantations are capable of producing enormous amounts of biomass within short periods of time. The challenge is, however, to sustain soil fertility, biodiversity and other ecosystem services such as clean water. (Photo by Viktor Bruckman)

It’s just possible that sustainable biomass could be, if not a panacea for the world’s energy challenges, then perhaps the next best thing.

And not only the energy sector would benefit. The reasons for the sustainable use of biomass are many and good, says Dr Viktor Bruckman of the Commission for Interdisciplinary Ecological Studies at the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

In addition to the energy aspect, he adds that biomass offers a range of possibilities as a valuable feedstock for industrial processes. Chemical compounds in biomass can be separated and rearranged to produce everything from composites for use in the automobile industry, to fibres to pesticide ingredients, among others.

He, along with Dr Sanjeev Kumar Chauhan of India’s Punjab Agricultural University and Dr Robert Jandl of Austria’s Federal Research and Training Centre for Forests, Natural Hazards and Landscape, will present a session entitled Sustainable Biomass for Energy and Industrial Raw Materials at the IUFRO World Congress this fall in Salt Lake City, USA.

In the session, Dr Bruckman and his colleagues will provide a review of current issues in biomass development from biomass cultivation to development of biomass-based products and conversion of biomass to energy, with a strong focus on forests. They want to identify hotspots and deficits in research and to provide a platform for international discussion and for the initiation of collaboration across borders and topics.

Outlining some of the positive attributes of biomass use, Dr Bruckman points out that it’s a renewable feedstock so its availability is nearly infinite and it has a value-added aspect in that it could create green jobs in remote areas.

As opposed to crude oil, biomass can be produced just about anywhere, so it has the potential to make the energy economy foundation more resilient. On the other hand, fossil fuel pricing – especially crude oil – is vulnerable to declining stores of easily available resources and political instability, among other issues.

Biomass is also nearly greenhouse gas neutral. Carbon released during its utilization was taken from the atmosphere during growth and, he adds, if used to feed industrial processess, it is also carbon-negative so long as the carbon sequestered during growth is trapped in the new material or product (and the longer the product’s life cycle, the better from a carbon sequestration perspective).

In some cases, he suggests, biomass feedstocks may even grow on marginal soils that are unsuitable for agriculture.

But he also notes that, on the other side of the biomass utilization ledger, there are some critical challenges that must be met head-on, including the possibility of competition between biomass crops and primary agricultural production.

Physical space is another issue. Biomass needs area in which to be produced and this implies land use change and some related negative consequences of that. Intensive cultivation may trigger groundwater pollution or exhaustion in dry regions and it may also trigger soil degradation which is difficult, if not impossible, to repair.

Dr Bruckman also notes that, from an ecological and carbon perspective, plus the related loss of biodiversity, changes to local climate and the release of large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere, it is a major negative factor if tropical forests are clear-cut to establish biomass crops.

But, he says, while these issues are indeed critical, they are not insurmountable. They can be addressed and overcome through research, multinational cooperation and the development and sharing of best practice guidelines.

It becomes a question of ensuring the measures taken to enhance biomass production are correctly implemented and appropriately managed, Dr Bruckman says.

A biomass system cannot be based on existing “fossil” infrastructure, and that is an important factor to keep in mind, he adds. To Dr Bruckman that means bio-based economies will have to act in a more localized and decentralized fashion. This will make the whole system more flexible and should help mitigate negative consequences from land use changes.

There is a need to develop the biomass sector, Dr Bruckman says, in order to sustain the planet for future generations. There is a huge potential. But biomass development, management and utilization must be science-based in order to rule out potentially negative consequences.


See you at the IUFRO 2014 World Congress!
http://iufro2014.com/
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Related Links

IUFRO Working Party 7.01.03 – Impacts of air pollution and climate change on forest ecosystems – Atmospheric deposition, soils and nutrient cycles, http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-7/70000/70100/70103/

IUFRO Research Group 1.03.00 – Short-rotation forestry, http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-1/10000/10300/

IUFRO Task Force on Forest Bioenergy, http://www.iufro.org/science/task-forces/forest-bioenergy/

IUFRO Spotlight main page, http://www.iufro.org/media/iufro-spotlights/

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IUFRO Spotlight is an initiative of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Its aim is to introduce, in a timely fashion, significant findings in forest research from IUFRO officeholders and member organizations to a worldwide network of decision makers, policy makers and researchers.

IUFRO Spotlight issues up to October 2014 will primarily focus on the IUFRO World Congress that will take place on 5-11 October 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. The topics of individual Congress sessions will be highlighted in order to draw attention to the wide variety of themes that will be addressed at the Congress and their importance on a regional and global scale. Find the IUFRO 2014 World Congress Scientific Program at: http://iufro2014.com/scientific-program/overview/

Congress Spotlight #22 – Green cities: The benefits of the urban forest

Green cities: The benefits of the urban forest

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Experiencing the floodplain forests of the city of Leipzig, Germany, from the river (photo by Matilda Annerstedt)

Experiencing the floodplain forests of the city of Leipzig, Germany, from the river (photo by Matilda Annerstedt)

The urban forest means different things to different people.

Many of us see only visually pleasing tree-lined streets, or enjoy the coolness afforded by shade trees on hot days.

Those more closely involved with the urban forest see that – and much, much more.

They also see the urban forest in terms of the ecosystem services and values derived from it – reduced energy use of buildings, improved air quality, stream flows, water quality, urban wildlife, human health, climate change (in terms of both mitigation and species composition) and other benefits that are environmental, social and economic.

As an example of the economic value of urban forests, the chief economist for Canada’s Toronto Dominion Bank was interviewed by CBC-TV following last winter’s severe ice storm in Toronto in which many trees were damaged or destroyed. In the interview, he estimated the value of Toronto’s urban forest – more than 10 million trees covering 30% (190 square kilometres) of the city – at about $7 billion to the local economy, saying the trees “represent an important investment in environmental condition, human health and the overall quality of life.”

This fall, at the IUFRO World Forest Congress in Salt Lake City, a session entitled: Urban forest diversity and ecosystem services will focus on species diversity in cities across the globe, the ecosystem services provided by them, how forest composition and species diversity affect those services and values and how the composition and species diversity are changing and will continue to change going forward.

Session coordinators are Dr. David Nowak of the U.S. Forest Service and Wesley Kocher of the International Society of Arboriculture.

Urban forests provide critical services and values to residents and are under threat from various forces, Dr. Nowak says. By understanding local urban forest composition and recognizing the forces of change, management plans can be developed to sustain healthy, functional urban forests for future generations.

The biggest challenge facing urban forests, according to Dr. Nowak, is how municipalities deal with the numerous forces that have and will continue to alter them – exotic insects and diseases, invasive plant species, climate change and urban development.

All of these forces, he says, will alter tree health and species composition and consequently will alter the ecosystem services and values derived from the urban forest.

Limited understanding and awareness of those issues by the urban population, a lack of specific management guidelines on how to minimize the negative impacts of those external forces and limited financial resources are all roadblocks that have to be overcome, says Dr. Nowak.

On the upside, he says, research is being conducted and tools are being developed to assess the structure and value of urban forests, and educational outreach about the forests’ values and the risks that face them is also taking place. Many cities and towns have also begun taking steps to increase species diversity.

At the Congress, the urban forest session will present data on species diversity in cities across the globe, discuss how urban forest composition and species diversity affects various ecosystem services and values and illustrate how and why composition and species diversity are likely to change.

The information out of the session can then be used to help guide future research and policies related to sustaining urban forests and the critical ecosystem services provided by them and to implementing programs and projects that will help achieve those ends.

Find out more about the activities of IUFRO’s Urban Forestry Research Group at: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-6/60000/60700/

 


See you at the IUFRO 2014 World Congress!
http://iufro2014.com/
Follow IUFRO 2014 on Twitter! Join IUFRO 2014 on Facebook!

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Related Links

IUFRO Research Group 6.07.00 – Urban forestry: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-6/60000/60700/
IUFRO Spotlight main page, http://www.iufro.org/media/iufro-spotlights/

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IUFRO Spotlight is an initiative of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Its aim is to introduce, in a timely fashion, significant findings in forest research from IUFRO officeholders and member organizations to a worldwide network of decision makers, policy makers and researchers.

IUFRO Spotlight issues up to October 2014 will primarily focus on the IUFRO World Congress that will take place on 5-11 October 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. The topics of individual Congress sessions will be highlighted in order to draw attention to the wide variety of themes that will be addressed at the Congress and their importance on a regional and global scale. Find the IUFRO 2014 World Congress Scientific Program at: http://iufro2014.com/scientific-program/overview/

Congress Spotlight #21 – The forest pharmacy and food store

The forest pharmacy and food store


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Forest berries (Petr Kratochvil)

Forest berries (Petr Kratochvil)

Sometimes, they say, you can’t see the forest for the trees.

And one group of sub-plenary session organizers for the upcoming IUFRO World Congress in Salt Lake City might amend that to read: “Sometimes you can’t see the forest for anything but the timber value in the trees.”

The organizers – Hannu Raitio and Tuija Sievänen of the Finnish Forest Research Institute; James Chamberlain of the U.S. Forest Service; and Carsten Smith-Hall of Denmark’s University of Copenhagen, will present a session entitled: The value and challenges of integrating food and medicinal forest products into forest management.

They want to encourage forest managers to include forest-derived foods and medicines, as well as timber, in their planning, policies and practices.

For millennia, forests have been sources of food and medicine ensuring human health and wellbeing, yet they are not fully appreciated and valued for those benefits, the organizers say.

They point to ginseng as one example. First harvested in China for its medicinal value, ginseng has over the years, contributed immeasurable amounts to the world economy and has had significant ecological impacts. In the United States, ginseng has been harvested commercially from eastern hardwood forests since the mid-1700s. Today it contributes more than $27 million annually to the regional economy.

It grows in some of the most bio-diverse temperate hardwood forests in the world. And yet, the forests have not been managed to conserve American ginseng and this plant – a valuable natural resource – that once was widespread throughout the forest, is now limited in its range, they say.

The organizers agree that foresters are very good in terms of doing what they are trained to do.

They point out that foresters can inventory a stand of trees and, with some confidence, estimate the commercial biomass. They can estimate the rate at which forests are growing. They can determine possible sustainable yields of wood products and they can recommend and implement silvicultural treatments and harvesting strategies that deliver maximum economic benefit while minimizing environmental costs.

But, the organizers say, foresters can’t do that for medicinal and-or edible forest products (MEFPs).

We don’t know the true financial or ecological value of MEFPs. And, the organizers say, that’s because MEFPs are considered less valuable than timber. But, they note – again using ginseng as an example – while a pound of cherry wood is worth about US$1.00, the average worth of a pound of ginseng root is about US$430.00.

Through their sub-plenary they aim to provide a forum where forest leadership can learn about the need to expand the forest management paradigm to include medicinal and edible forest products and the plants, people and places that depend on them.

They do see some positive signs of that – emanating primarily from developing countries.

The reason for the developing countries’ leadership, the organizers say, is that MEFPs and other non-timber forest products (NTFPs) are more fully appreciated in those less affluent countries where people live “closer” to the forest and are more dependent on forests for their daily needs.

More affluent countries – where the population does not depend on medicinal and edible forest products on a daily basis – tend to treat MEFPs as “special” rather than treating them in the same way as other managed natural resources.

The forestry community, especially in more developed countries, is fixated on trees, and timber is “the tail that wags the dog”, according to the sub-plenary organizers.


See you at the IUFRO 2014 World Congress!
http://iufro2014.com/
Follow IUFRO 2014 on Twitter! Join IUFRO 2014 on Facebook!

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Related Links

IUFRO Research Group 5.11.00 – Non-wood forest products: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-5/50000/51100/
IUFRO Division 6 – Social Aspects of Forests and Forestry
: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-6/
IUFRO Task Force on Forests and Human Health: http://www.iufro.org/science/task-forces/forests-trees-humans/
IUFRO Spotlight main page, http://www.iufro.org/media/iufro-spotlights/

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IUFRO Spotlight is an initiative of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Its aim is to introduce, in a timely fashion, significant findings in forest research from IUFRO officeholders and member organizations to a worldwide network of decision makers, policy makers and researchers.

IUFRO Spotlight issues up to October 2014 will primarily focus on the IUFRO World Congress that will take place on 5-11 October 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. The topics of individual Congress sessions will be highlighted in order to draw attention to the wide variety of themes that will be addressed at the Congress and their importance on a regional and global scale. Find the IUFRO 2014 World Congress Scientific Program at: http://iufro2014.com/scientific-program/overview/

Congress Spotlight #20 – The climate’s changing: So should forest management

The climate’s changing: So should forest management


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In Berlin, the capital city of Germany, a comprehensive program of converting pine stands into close-to-nature mixed forest is being implemented, thus making the forest more resilient to future climate change effects, for example. (Photo by IUFRO)

In Berlin, the capital city of Germany, a comprehensive program of converting pine stands into close-to-nature mixed forest is being implemented, thus making the forest more resilient to future climate change effects, for example. (Photo by IUFRO)

As a joke, people used to say: “If you don’t like the weather, just wait a minute. It’ll change.”

Now they say that about the climate – but they’re a lot more serious.

The rapidly changing climate will precipitate related changes throughout nature. And that includes the world’s forests.

Anticipating climate change impacts on forests and adapting policies and management strategies to mitigate those impacts is critical to maintain the health of those forests and, by extension, of the earth.

Forest management for adaptation to climate change” is the theme of a session being presented at the 24th IUFRO World Congress in Salt Lake City this fall, by Drs. Rodney Keenan of the University of Melbourne, Australia; Carina Keskitalo of Umeå University, Sweden; Kalame Fobissie of the World Wildlife Fund Central Africa, Cameroon; and Guangyu Wang of the University of British Columbia, Canada.

They anticipate that future management plans will have to consider a wider range of possibilities – factoring in such things as increased risk of invasive species; pest outbreaks; fire; storms and other disturbances; matching tree species and populations to changed and changing climates; and planting multipurpose trees (timber, foods, fuel, medicines, etc.) to mitigate the effect on forest-dependent communities, to name just a few.

Capacity building and raising awareness are also vital to ensure that decision makers and forest managers will understand the science and concept of climate change and the impact it will have on forest ecosystems. Training, learning from others’ best practices (several of which, from different parts of the world, will be discussed during this session) and better understanding how management practices can enhance adaptation and mitigation are key, they say.

Looking at the uncertainty of future conditions, the organizers suggest the traditional model where a researcher takes a problem, goes away, does experiments and comes back to the manager with “the answer” won’t work. By the time the researcher has a clear answer, they say, the conditions may be different.

Interactions among policy makers, forest managers, researchers and the community will have to become closer and more intertwined. Rather than operating in relatively independent silos, ongoing relationships and continuing, regular dialogue about the changing nature of conditions, how different values are being affected and what the management actions and alternatives might be, should become the norm.

From their session they hope to engender a discussion on the different approaches being adopted in different forest types in different parts of the world; the different governance systems; the scientific approaches, ecological options, tools and adaptation approaches; and to find out what is, and what is not, working.

And, they add, underlying any successful adaptation strategies anywhere in the world is the political will to make it happen. That means funding the research and planning, and acting to ensure the implementation of adaptation initiatives.

One of the main challenges, the session organizers say, is to become more proactive – moving from a “let’s deal with this when the time comes” mentality to one that says: “This is happening. This is real. Let’s get to work on it.


Also visit IUFRO Working Party 4.04.08 – Adaptation to climate change for more information.


Congress early bird deadline extended to May 7!

See you at the IUFRO 2014 World Congress!
http://iufro2014.com/
Follow IUFRO 2014 on Twitter! Join IUFRO 2014 on Facebook!

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Related Links

IUFRO Working Party 4.04.08 – Adaptation to climate change: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-4/40000/40400/40408/

IUFRO Spotlight main page, http://www.iufro.org/media/iufro-spotlights/

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IUFRO Spotlight is an initiative of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Its aim is to introduce, in a timely fashion, significant findings in forest research from IUFRO officeholders and member organizations to a worldwide network of decision makers, policy makers and researchers.

IUFRO Spotlight issues up to October 2014 will primarily focus on the IUFRO World Congress that will take place on 5-11 October 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. The topics of individual Congress sessions will be highlighted in order to draw attention to the wide variety of themes that will be addressed at the Congress and their importance on a regional and global scale. Find the IUFRO 2014 World Congress Scientific Program at: http://iufro2014.com/scientific-program/overview/

Congress Spotlight #19 – ‘Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?

‘Citizen science': A way to fight invasive species?


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At Shelley Beach, a few miles North of San Francisco, tanoaks and oaks, the most sacred trees to native people of the Northern California coast,  have been decimated due to the exotic disease known as Sudden Oak Death (SOD). SOD is thus not only changing the landscape dynamics but also profoundly altering the local culture. (Photo by Matteo Garbelotto)

At Shelley Beach, a few miles North of San Francisco, tanoaks and oaks, the most sacred trees to native people of the Northern California coast, have been decimated due to the exotic disease known as Sudden Oak Death (SOD). SOD is thus not only changing the landscape dynamics but also profoundly altering the local culture. (Photo by Matteo Garbelotto)

Invasive species are a threat to forest ecosystems around the world.

No surprise there.

Thousands of invasive flora and fauna have been transported – sometimes by accident, sometimes by design – to different continents and countries. Very often their impact is detrimental to their new region.

But, usually when one thinks of the negative impacts of invasive species, top of mind would be the effect on the economy – for instance, phytophthora dieback, an Asian import, affects the economically important jarrah tree in Australia. Or perhaps one would think of environmental damage, such as the destructive swath cut through the forests of Tierra del Fuego by imported North American beaver, to give just two illustrations of unwanted economic/environmental results.

But the societal impact is equally important.

And at the 24th IUFRO World Congress in Salt Lake City this fall, a session on the “societal impacts of invasive forest pathogens and pests”, will be presented by organizers Matteo Garbelotto of the University of California at Berkeley, USA; Giles Hardy of Murdoch University, Australia; and Paolo Gonthier of the University of Turin, Italy.

The organizers note that anything that has an economic impact has a societal impact, but there are many issues related to loss of plant hosts that can have a serious cultural impact with no apparent economic impact.

One example would be sacred tree species. The tanoak, which grows in parts of California and Oregon in the USA, is not of significant economic value per se, but it is sacred to some native Californians from the Central and Northern coast. They use tanoak acorns to make a traditional/ritual dish. However, tanoak is being decimated by Sudden Oak Death, which is believed to have originated in Asia, and the loss of this tree species is a major tragedy for these native people because it eliminates an important linkage with their past.

As a second example, the organizers note that closing forests to the public to prevent the spread of invasive pests and diseases is another case of societal impact – withdrawal of an environmental service – that is difficult to place a monetary value on.

One of the motivations for the symposium is to alert the scientific community to the need to work more closely with stakeholders and the public to better explain what the non-economic loss of a tree can mean to different social groups.

The organizers see this “citizen science” (one definition of which is: the engagement of non-scientists in decision-making about policy issues that have technical or scientific components) as a way to move forward in the fight against invasives.

Their hope is that by making the public partners with a stake in the issue – as well as some clout with decision-makers – rather than clients, it will help form a bond with the public that will generate enough pressure to bring about change in the way some sectors of the economy operate.

They note that the international trade in certain products – live plants and untreated wood, among others – offers the major pathway and entry point for invasives. But rapid, definitive action is difficult because that trade affects so many different interests.

For that reason they believe that researchers must spend more time providing policy makers, other stakeholders and the public with relevant, fact-based, easily understood information about the nature and mechanisms that lead to invasives’ introductions and to the wide-ranging implications. Otherwise, they say, one can’t really expect governments to make quick decisions on issues that have such huge economic ramifications.


Visit the webpages of IUFRO Division 7 Forest Health to find out more about IUFRO’s activities in this field:
http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-7/


See you at the IUFRO 2014 World Congress!

http://iufro2014.com/
Follow IUFRO 2014 on Twitter! Join IUFRO 2014 on Facebook!

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Related Links

The Montesclaros Declaration: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-7/70000/publications/montesclaros-declaration/

Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month: http://bugwood.blogspot.co.at/2014/04/invasive-plant-pest-and-disease.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+Bugwood+%28Bugwood%29

FAO: Invasive alien plants in the forests of Asia and the Pacific. By K.V. Sankaran and T.A. Suresh. http://www.fao.org/docrep/018/i3276e/i3276e00.htm

Twitter: #invasives

IUFRO Division 7 – Forest Health: http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-7/

IUFRO Spotlight main page, http://www.iufro.org/media/iufro-spotlights/

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IUFRO Spotlight is an initiative of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Its aim is to introduce, in a timely fashion, significant findings in forest research from IUFRO officeholders and member organizations to a worldwide network of decision makers, policy makers and researchers.

IUFRO Spotlight issues up to October 2014 will primarily focus on the IUFRO World Congress that will take place on 5-11 October 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. The topics of individual Congress sessions will be highlighted in order to draw attention to the wide variety of themes that will be addressed at the Congress and their importance on a regional and global scale. Find the IUFRO 2014 World Congress Scientific Program at: http://iufro2014.com/scientific-program/overview/

Congress Spotlight #18 – Consumers and Industry: Keen on Green

Consumers and Industry: Keen on Green


PDF for download

Looking toward the future is enough to make you, ahem, “turn green” with envy.

© beermedia – Fotolia.com

© beermedia – Fotolia.com

It’s all about a greener future.

That future and, more specifically, how it relates to the world’s forests will be one of many subjects discussed at the XXIV IUFRO World Congress in Salt Lake City, Utah, this fall.

A session there, entitled Forests and Forest Products for a Greener Future will look at how business and marketing will contribute to that goal.

Organized by Eric Hansen of Oregon State University, Tom Hammett of Virginia Tech and Birger Solberg of the Norwegian University of Life Sciences, it will cover a wide range of business and marketing theory topics that address how products and markets (timber and non-timber) can be expected to contribute to the greening effect.

The goal of their session is to convey a sense of the cutting edge work that is taking place in this field as consumers and industry embrace a greener future.

They point at some of today’s forest-related green initiatives that are, for the most part, in their infancy but offer the potential for massive leaps forward. Among them, a range of biochemicals, biomaterials and bioethanol, all from renewable materials; medical products such as wood-based casts for fractures; a growing interest in designing and building wooden skyscrapers; the positives around biophilic design (connecting nature and people in the places where they work, live and learn); and nanocellulose, where possible products include everything from body armor to automobile components to highly absorbent wound dressings, tampons and diapers. For these innovations to be successful, marketing will play a key role.

The range of research opportunities is immense, they say.

Business and marketing practices, through the value chains that process and transport forest-based products from forest to consumer, have a significant influence on the interactions between society and forests, the researchers note.

They also say that much current business and marketing research is about consumer/customer reactions to products and services, and that going forward in this area, research should play an increasingly important role in identifying green products that can be successfully adopted in the market place.

And they mention environmental marketing, eco-labeling, supply chain optimization and design for environment as some current practices that help the push toward a greener milieu.

Their session will also look at the idea of improving effectiveness in the supply chain. They note that in addition to the financial benefits, an efficient supply chain can also result in lower environmental impacts.

Other questions being explored focus on corporate social responsibility; a growing issue in both the business and research worlds. As examples of discussion points they ask: what motivates companies to be responsible? What policies can be put in place to encourage and-or reward that responsibility? Why do some companies embrace the concept and others not?

The organizers note there are relatively few forest researchers and academics specializing in marketing and business management issues (as opposed to traditional forest economics), so there is much room to study and improve understanding of the various important issues in the area.

This session aims to stir a wider discussion and engender increased interest in exploring more of those issues.

IUFRO Research Group 5.10.00 on Facebook:  Forest Products Marketing and Business Management


See you at the IUFRO 2014 World Congress!

http://iufro2014.com/
Follow IUFRO 2014 on Twitter! Join IUFRO 2014 on Facebook!

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21 March - International Day of Forests

21 March – International Day of Forests

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Related Links

IUFRO Research Group 5.10.00 – Forest products marketing and business management:
http://www.iufro.org/science/divisions/division-5/50000/51000/

IUFRO Spotlight main page, http://www.iufro.org/media/iufro-spotlights/

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IUFRO Spotlight is an initiative of the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Its aim is to introduce, in a timely fashion, significant findings in forest research from IUFRO officeholders and member organizations to a worldwide network of decision makers, policy makers and researchers.

IUFRO Spotlight issues up to October 2014 will primarily focus on the IUFRO World Congress that will take place on 5-11 October 2014 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. The topics of individual Congress sessions will be highlighted in order to draw attention to the wide variety of themes that will be addressed at the Congress and their importance on a regional and global scale. Find the IUFRO 2014 World Congress Scientific Program at: http://iufro2014.com/scientific-program/overview/

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